Best 30 Hibiscus Varieties (Photos and Seeds to Buy)

Among the nearly endless types of blooms that can grace your garden, one of the most popular and beautiful kinds is the hibiscus flower. They are typically hardy plants, with lovely blossoms that are easily associated with sunshine, summer, and a stroll through the garden.

So whether you want to plant this gorgeous flowering shrub in your garden plot, in a container on the porch, or even in a small windowsill garden, there are so many types to choose from.

Let’s take a closer look at the wide array of hibiscus varieties and some of their key characteristics, starting with a brief look at the family of hibiscus flowers as a whole, before we move on to individual blooms.


Hibiscus Flowers: How Many Hibiscus Varieties Are There?

As a versatile and adaptable species, hibiscuses come in three main plant types. These categories determine the climate conditions, watering needs, and overall growth characteristics of each type, based on where they are native to.

Hardy Hibiscus Plants (Hibiscus Moscheutos)

Hibiscus Moscheutos

True to their name, Hardy Hibiscus types can withstand a variety of temperatures that includes frost and full sun. However, you will see these plants wither as the season progresses, and ultimately die back to ground level after frosts begin.

Don’t worry though—these perennials do return in the spring, albeit later than other types of perennial flowering hedges, as they must regrow directly from the root systems left over from the last season.

The blooms on Hardy Hibiscuses tend to be incredibly large and bold in color, with vibrant pinks, reds, and crisp whites expanding up to 10 inches in width!

Rose Of Sharon Hibiscus Plants (Hibiscus Syriacus)

These hibiscuses can survive in cooler temperatures, even down to about -20°F, but they do prefer a sunny environment for blooming in.

Look for pink, purple, red, and white flowers when it comes to these hibiscus varieties, with single or double petal coverage.

You will generally see smaller leaf spreads and blossoms on Rose of Sharon Hibiscuses, given their adaptability to colder conditions, but you still need plenty of room for them to grow in. These plants will commonly expand to about 8 feet tall, and can be quite thick at up to 3 feet wide.

Hibiscus Syriacus

Tropical Hibiscus Plants (Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis)

These hibiscus types are sunny shrubs with dark green leaves, and typically offer blooms in a variety of pastel colors. This includes lavender, purple, pink, red, orange, yellow, white, and even bicolor combinations.

As the name suggests, these plants are a tropical variety, and as such require warm weather and protection from frost. If you live in a cold area (typically below 50°F) and don’t want your hibiscus plants to die as summer wanes, try bringing them indoors if they are in pots, and care for them as houseplants.

Otherwise, expect to have to plant these hibiscus varieties every year to keep them blooming in your garden over the summer, and watch them grow up to around 10 feet or more in the proper conditions!

hibiscus rosa-sinensis

Top Hibiscus Varieties

Now that we have investigated the three main categories for the following hibiscus varieties, we can explore some of the more popular individual plants and hybrids that you can find at most local plant centers.

If you want more specific information on 30 of the top hibiscus varieties that gardeners favor, then keep on reading to learn more!

1. Abelmosk

Botanical Name: Abelmoschus Moschatus

Height: 5 to 6 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9 to 11

Climate: Full sun

A classic amongst hibiscus varieties, this lovely and hardy flower thrives in hot summer climates, and blooms in yellows, pinks, and even a delightful orange-red hue. Also known as Musk Mallow, you will enjoy blooms from June until the first frost with this low-maintenance, drought-tolerant plant.

Abelmosk Hibiscus

2. Aphrodite

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Syriacus ‘Aphrodite’

Height: 3 to 5 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 8

Climate: Full sun to part shade

A delicate, lacy pink bloom with a dark red eye and yellow stamens, the Aphrodite variety is great for use as a hedge on your property that attracts all types of butterflies.

This plant is perfect for urban conditions, and is even resistant to deer nibbling on the leaves while being a wonderful self-seeder in optimal growing conditions. It blooms from June to October, with low maintenance requirements for such showy flowers.

Aphrodite Hibiscus

3. Beach Beauty

Botanical Name: Hibiscus ‘Beach Beauty’

Height: 15 to 20 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 10 to 11

Climate: Full sun

A medium-sized bush hibiscus, the Beach Beauty variety is a vibrant addition to your garden. Look forward to flowers with sunshine yellow petals, with interiors of white and pink that fade into orange around the edges of the bloom.

With heights that can reach up to 20 feet tall, and flowers that are 6 to 8 inches wide, your Beach Beauty will be the star of any other hibiscus varieties planted on your property, stealing the show all summer long.

Beach Beauty Hibiscus

4. Bedazzled

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis ‘Bedazzled’

Height: 4 to 10 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9 to 11

Climate: Full sun to part shade

A hybrid hibiscus, the Bedazzled bloom sports incredible looking ruffled flowers that glow deep orange and red colors in the summer sun, without losing their hue even in the heat. Instead, this plant native to tropical parts of Asia and China thrives in full sun exposure.

Also part of the Chinese hibiscus family, this broadleaf evergreen is perfect for an annual hedge planting, with seasonal and showy flowers attracting both butterflies and hummingbirds.

Bedazzled Hibiscus

5. Black Dragon

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis ‘Black Dragon’

Height: 3 to 6 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9 to 11

Climate: Full sun to partial shade

Not quite as tall as other hibiscus varieties, nevertheless the Black Dragon strain is a gorgeous bloom that appears nearly black in some lights, although it is actually a deep burgundy color.

As a wildlife attractant hedge or windbreak, it is suited to annual planting and is tolerant of humidity. You will enjoy the many bumblebees and butterflies that flock to the Black Dragon blooms during the summer months, among other pollinators.

Black Dragon Hibiscus

6. Blue Bird

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Syriacus ‘Blue Bird’

Height: 3 to 4 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 9

Climate: Full sun to partial shade

Incredibly popular among gardeners, this is one of the loveliest hibiscus varieties that you can add to your yard. With stunning blues and delicate purple-pink interiors, these blooms glow and catch the attention of every passerby, adding instantaneous curb appeal.

As a type of tropical hibiscus, this perennial shrub will attract a variety of pollinators, including hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies. It’s a perfect ornamental plant that will enhance your entire space with year-round flowers!

Blue Bird Hibiscus

7. Blue River II

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Moscheutos ‘Blue River II’

Height: Up to 1.5 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a to 10b

Climate: Full sun to partial shade

If you are looking for hibiscus varieties that bloom from mid-summer until early fall, the Blue River II might be for you. It is a smaller plant that showcases big, fluffy white flowers for the entire summer, and thrives in the sunshine.

Also known as the Swamp Rose Mallow, this flower prefers wet soil conditions, and can be found growing in boggy gardens. It’s also suitable for winter sowing, making it easy to propagate indoors for the next season.

Blue River II Hibiscus

8. Champagne

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Moscheutos ‘Summer Spice Pink Champagne’

Height: 2 to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a to 10b

Climate: Full sun to partial shade

The Champagne variety of hibiscus is a stunning little bloom, with creamy pink tones true to its name and reminiscent of the color of sparkling wine. It enjoys a slightly acidic soil pH, with flowers that show up during the summer and last into the early fall.

Though a shorter type of hibiscus, gardeners commonly use this variety as a hedge, due to its humidity tolerance and pollinator attraction, including bees and butterflies. You can also plant this flower in pots for mobility, given that you ensure plenty of bottom drainage.

Champagne Hibiscus

9. Checkered Hibiscus

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis ‘Cooperii’

Height: Up to 6 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 10 and 11

Climate: Full sun to light shade

The Checkered Hibiscus is a tropical variety that loves direct sunlight exposure, but can also grow in more shaded areas. The key to the brightest pigments does lie in having at least several hours under the hot sun, however.

This is a medium to large-sized shrub that is drought tolerant, but also sensitive to the cold, so flowering will likely end at the first frost. However, with pollen and nectar-rich blooms, expect your yard to be full of butterflies and hummingbirds for the entire summer!

Checkered Hibiscus

10. Cherry Cheesecake

Botanical Name: Hibiscus ‘Cherry Cheesecake’

Height: 4 to 5 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 9

Climate: Full sun

With glorious, confectionary-reminiscent flowers, the Cherry Cheesecake type is a gem among hibiscus varieties. It is low maintenance with medium wetness needs, so using it in your rain garden is a great option.

Additionally, it can tolerate deer and other herbivores nibbling on its leaves, leaving plenty of nectar for the hummingbirds it attracts to the large pink and white flowers that are interspersed with magenta streaks with a bright red eye in the center.

Cherry Cheesecake Hibiscus

11. China Rose

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis

Height: 5 to 6 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9 to 11

Climate: Full sun

Arguably among the top most popular hibiscus varieties, the China Rose is favored for its double petaled flowers in a range of oranges, pinks, yellows, and light reds.

It’s a perfect shrub for adding flowers to a hedge setting, and even has low maintenance needs so just about anyone can grow it successfully!

12. Confederate Rose

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Mutabilis

Height: 3 to 7 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 9

Climate: Full sun

Also known as the Dixie Rose Mallow, this hibiscus plant is famed for producing double flowers from its first blooming in the early summer right into late fall. This species is native to Missouri, and as such, tolerates plenty of heat and humidity.

Beginning as a mixture of white and pink petals, this color deepens and turns a lovely red before being replaced with new blossoms. It prefers full sun and good soil drainage, though it can be planted in an area that collects water as well.

13. Cranberry Hibiscus

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Acetosella

Height: 3 to 6 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8 to 9

Climate: Full sun to partial shade

Beloved for its glorious red foliage that accompanies stunning pink blooms, the Cranberry Hibiscus is one of the favorite hibiscus varieties for gardeners looking to make a splash on their property.

This plant’s leaves sport a lovely mixture of crimson and copper, reminiscent of a maple tree’s autumnal foliage. And paired with this, the burgundy and light pink blooms just heighten the aesthetic appeal of this hardy, showy hibiscus.

One of the best parts of the Cranberry Hibiscus variety is its edibility—you can add both the leaves and flowers themselves to a variety of dishes, including salads, teas, and even cocktails.

14. Exuberance

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis ‘Exuberance’

Height: 4 to 5 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 9

Climate: Full sun to partial shade

Routinely planted in gardens around America, this plant is a spectacular addition to favorite hibiscus varieties. It has gorgeous blossoms of orange, pink, yellow, and red, combined into frilly-petaled, multi-colored clusters of about 7 inches apiece.

The Exuberance strain is also very attractive to pollinators due to its high levels of nectar, which means that your garden will have plenty of bee and butterfly visitors throughout its flowering season.

15. Flower Of An Hour

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Trionum

Height: 2 to 5 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 2 to 11

Climate: Full sun

A stately addition to your garden, this hibiscus plant flowers from early June through October, with big blooms of white and pale yellow, centered with dark purple hues.

However, though the Flower of an Hour variety will indeed blossom for several months, its name is derived from the ability of each flower to wilt after only a few hours of full bloom. So, don’t expect this hibiscus to keep its pretty flowers for too long!

16. Giant Rose Mallow

Botanical Name: Hibiscus ‘Giant Rose Mallow’

Height: 4 to 5 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4a to 9b

Climate: Full sun to partial sun

If you are looking for an eye-catching addition to your garden, the Giant Rose Mallow might be perfect for you. With flowers that bloom up to 10 or 12 inches in width, this hibiscus is true to its name, offering lovely white and magenta petals with a ruffled edge and bright red center.

Apart from the blooms themselves, even the rest of this shrub is attractive, with deep green, fluffy foliage that is reminiscent of maple leaves before their colors turn.

17. Hawaiian Hibiscus

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis ‘Hawaiian Hibiscus’

Height: 8 to 15 feet tall in mainland U.S. conditions, up to 30 feet tall in tropical areas.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 9

Climate: Full sun

You might recognize this bloom as the state flower of Hawaii, giving it a tropical flair. However, this species is actually originally native to China, growing lushly in sunny, tropical conditions, which also make it perfect for year-round blossoms.

Look forward to their bright, buttery yellow colors, which fade into a candy-pink and red center, full of nectar that will attract a variety of happy little pollinators.

18. Tricolor Hibiscus

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis ‘Tricolor’

Height: 6.5 to 16.5 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4a to 9a

Climate: Full sun

With variegated leaves tinged in green, pink, and white, the Tricolor Hibiscus is a unique-looking plant. It also sports large, round blossoms with widely-spaced petals that range from light pink to creamy red at the edges, turning to a deep, rich burgundy in the center.

This plant also offers flowers year-round, with zone tolerance of both heat and cold. These blooms especially appreciate access to full sun, or at least lightly shaded areas, and are great for planting as a solitary feature in your garden.

19. Kenaf

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Cannabinus

Height: Up to 6 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6 to 12

Climate: Full sun

One of the more popular types of hibiscus varieties, Kenaf is also known as Brown Indianhemp, and is a particularly fast-growing plant. It flowers relatively late compared to other types of hibiscuses, from August to September, giving your garden some lovely autumnal blossoms.

20. Lord Baltimore

Botanical Name: Hibiscus ‘Lord Baltimore’

Height: 5 to 6 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9 to 11

Climate: Full sun

The Lord Baltimore hybrid is another favorite when it comes to hibiscus varieties, known for its expansive blooms—reaching between 8 and 10 inches in width. These vibrant red flowers have ruffled petals for a showy look in the garden.

With foliage that forms a big, bushy mound and persists for the duration of the summer, it is best to plant Lord Baltimore in an area with full sun but minimal wind, as excessive drafts will cause windburn.

21. Luna Pink Swirl

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Moschatus ‘Luna Pink Swirl’

Height: 2 to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 5

Climate: Full sun

Another entry in the most popular hibiscus varieties, the “Luna” hybrids are beloved among botanists and gardeners alike for their hardiness and regrowth ability as a perennial.

The Luna Pink Swirl boasts a stunning pink, white, and red patterning. It grows into a medium-sized bush and continues to flower until the first frost, after which it will regrow in the spring from the existing root system.

22. Luna Red Hibiscus

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Moschatus ‘Luna Red’

Height: 2 to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 5

Climate: Full sun

Another in the “Luna” catalog of hibiscus types, the Luna Red strain is a showy plant that enjoys medium to wet conditions with full sun access. Like other nectar-heavy hybrids, it attracts plenty of butterflies and will continue to bloom from July until September.

23. Luna White Hibiscus

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Moschatus ‘Luna White’

Height: 2 to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 5

Climate: Full sun

A paler addition to the “Luna” hibiscus hybrids, the white and light pink color palette of this flower is known to glow in the evenings and give your garden a spectacular sense of ethereality.

These drought-tolerant plants will also regrow in the spring, allowing you to enjoy their large and lovely blossoms year after year.

24. Mango Liqueur

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis ‘Mango Liqueur’

Height: 10 to 12 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 10 to 12

Climate: Full sun to partial sun

With wide, ruffly-petaled blooms that mature into gold and orange hues, the Mango Liqueur hybrid is indeed reminiscent of a fruity drink and is a favorite for live floral decor in weddings and other such occasions.

This plant in particular is a flamboyant and fun hibiscus addition to your garden landscape with a wonderful array of active blossoms.

25. Rock Hibiscus

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Denudatus

Height: Up to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9 to 11

Climate: Full sun

Originally native to the continental United States and Mexico, this little hibiscus shrub likes to grow along rock surfaces, and they can even thrive even in washes and on steep hillsides.

This is a primarily desert condition shrub that blooms in pinks, purples, and whites, with an early season lasting between February and May. Its leaves tend to be small, elongated, and somewhat scraggly, but the Rock Hibiscus is a great ornamental option for arid gardens.

26. Rose Mallow

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Moschatus

Height: 3 to 8 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4a to 9b

Climate: Full sun

Like the Giant variety we encountered earlier, the Rose Mallow is a lovely multicolored plant that returns perennially. Enjoy its hues that change from white to maroon towards the center, finishing with a dark red interior.

This is one of the larger flowering blooms in terms of hibiscus varieties, with petal widths reaching up to 7 or 8 inches across. The shrub’s foliage typically boasts little white hairs along the surface of the leaves and toothed edges.

27. Roselle

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Sabdariffa

Height: 7 to 8 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8 to 11

Climate: Full sun to partial or sheltered sun

Another popular option for hibiscus varieties in the garden, the Roselle hybrid is native to Africa and boasts gorgeous blooms for the entirety of the season. You can also use parts of the plant in cooking and for medicinal purposes.

These flowers will form into light pink, white, and gentle yellow tinges on the outer petals, deepening into vibrant maroon in the very center. In addition, as the blooms prepare to open, you can even enjoy the look of the crimson buds as they mature.

28. Scarlet Rosemallow

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Coccineus

Height: 6 to 7 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6 to 13

Climate: Full sun or partial shade

A unique-looking and woody type of hibiscus, you might also know the Scarlet Rosemallow as the Texas Star Hibiscus. This is because of its particular appearance, with five red petals that lead it to resemble a star.

It enjoys full sun or a partly shady area, and tolerates humidity fairly well. Many gardeners find this plant perfect for use in bog gardens, rain gardens, or even alongside streams and ponds as it thrives in medium and wet soil conditions.

29. Sea Hibiscus

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Tiliaceus

Height: 12 to 25 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 10 to 12

Climate: Full sun

A stunning hibiscus variety that can be found in many Asian locations, including common use as a type of bonsai in Taiwan, adding this plant to your garden is a great option.

The Sea Hibiscus boasts vibrant, buttery-yellow blooms with dark maroon centers and thick, broadleaf foliage. It is also one of the taller hibiscus varieties, perfect for use as a hedge for natural privacy screening.

30. White Chiffon

Botanical Name: Hibiscus Syriacus ‘White Chiffon’

Height: 8 to 12 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 9

Climate: Full sun

A stunning type of hibiscus, the White Chiffon hybrid is a wonderful flowering shrub for attracting plenty of butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds to your yard. It is resistant to drought, salty air, and even most types of deer, making it a hardy plant.

If you want to have a tall expanse of flowers for privacy, this is a great option, as it blooms continuously from summer into the fall with an expanse of lacy white blossoms.

White Chiffon Hibiscus


Best Hibiscus Seeds And Plants

But where can you find some good hibiscus specimens to add to your garden? Let’s explore some of the best hibiscus seeds and plants that are available to online shoppers today.

OUR FAVORITES

  • Paper seed packaging, ready for planting
  • Clear germination and growing instructions
  • Great amount of coverage for the price
CHECK PRICE →
  • Good range of colors, including red, pink, and white.
  • Long blooming time
  • Hardy to zone 5
CHECK PRICE →
  • Perennial plant for repeated regrowth
  • No germination required
  • Ready for immediate planting
CHECK PRICE →

1. Mixed Luna Hibiscus Moscheutos — Best Overall

Top Pick
Mixed Luna Hibiscus Moscheutos

With a variety of hardy hibiscus types, the Mixed Luna Hibiscus Moscheutos seed selection gives gardeners a range of the ever-popular “Luna” perennial hybrid, with lovely blossoms in many colors that will continue to regrow every late spring for continual flower power.

Style: Seed packet

Application: Ready to plant

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 11

Number of Pieces: 25

For those looking to plant a wide range of hardy and gorgeous hibiscus flowers, Mixed Luna Hibiscus Moscheutos is a great option. These blooms open to about 6 inches across and will flower repeatedly until the first frost, regrowing during the next spring.

Make sure you have plenty of sunshine, as well as soil conditions that are well-drained for these hibiscus flowers to thrive in your garden all summer long and add a dash of the tropics to your yard.

Pros

  • Great variety mix of the popular “Luna” hibiscus variety.
  • Good range of colors, including red, pink, and white.
  • Long blooming time
  • Hardy to zone 5

Cons

  • Particular colors not guaranteed
  • Small number of seeds for the price

2. Red Roselle Seeds (Hibiscus Sabdariffa) — Runner Up

Runner Up
Red Roselle Seeds (Hibiscus Sabdariffa)

Red Roselle Seeds are a great option for your garden, offering stunning red and pink colorations and tall, full shrubs. This plant is hardy and can withstand changes in temperature, making it ideal for many types of properties.

Style: Seed packet

Application: Ready to plant

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8 to 11

Number of Pieces: 50

Roselle Hibiscuses are a popular type of flower for many gardeners, and this mixture is a great option for anyone wanting to add a pop of crimson to their plantings. These flowers grow quickly and form a thick bush, perfect for borders or hedging your garden.

You can even use parts of the antioxidant-rich Roselle plant for medicinal and culinary purposes. This includes teas, salads, sauces, and poultices, making it a great addition to any working garden.

 

Pros

  • Paper seed packaging, ready for planting
  • Clear germination and growing instructions
  • Great amount of coverage for the price

Cons

  • Some buyers have trouble with seed germination

3. Proven Winner Pillar Rose Of Sharon Hibiscus — Best Ready For Planting Shrub

Best Ready For Planting Shrub
Proven Winner Pillar Rose Of Sharon Hibiscus

Skip the germination stage with the Proven Winner White Pillar Rose Of Sharon Hibiscus, and add it directly to your garden with flowers already cultivated. You can expect this shrub to bloom beautifully from spring until the first frost of fall, providing a great growing period.

Style: Pillar-style shrub

Application: Ready to plant

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 9

Number of Pieces: 1 shrub

For homeowners and gardeners who want a pre-grown, ready to plant hibiscus, this is a great option. With lush, verdant foliage and large white blooms, your new full sun hibiscus is prime for planting and will continue to thrive with a regular watering schedule.

You will experience loss of foliage and blooms after the first frost, but as a perennial plant, this hibiscus should reemerge in the spring and continue to bloom for repeated seasons.

Pros

  • Perennial plant for repeated regrowth
  • No germination required
  • Ready for immediate planting

Cons

  • Some specimen orders have arrived damaged

4. Double Confederate Cotton Rose (Hibiscus Mutabilis)

Cotton Rose
Double Confederate (Hibiscus Mutabilis)

A lovely and rare type of hibiscus, the Double Confederate Cotton Rose seed mix is a southern beauty, perfect for a variety of property locations and attracting many types of butterflies and bumblebees to the garden.

Style: Seed packet

Application: Ready to plant

USDA Hardiness Zone: 7 to 11

Number of Pieces: 10

Enjoy these delicate flowers as they open in the morning and change from being light pink and white to purple and maroon over the course of a day. Though a fast-blooming variety, they will repeatedly flower from late summer into early fall.

And as a prominent nectar source for pollinators, you can anticipate your entire yard being full of butterflies and hummingbirds during the entire season.

Pros

  • Great for encouraging pollinators into the garden
  • Beautiful color display
  • Long blooming period

Cons

  • Small number of seeds for the price
  • Some customers have had issues with sprouting

5. Brown Indianhemp (Hibiscus Cannabinus ‘Yellow’)

Multi-use Type
Brown Indianhemp (Hibiscus Cannabinus)

If you are looking for a multi-use type of hibiscus that also looks great in the garden, Brown Indianhemp seeds might be for you. These yellow flowers stretch to expanses of up to 12 feet and provide an ideal type of hedge for your property.

Style: Seed packet

Application: Ready to plant

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6 to 12

Number of Pieces: 10

Otherwise known as Kenaf, this flower type is known for its candy-yellow hues and practical uses. You can harvest the seeds for roasting, either eating them, pressing them into oil, or grinding them into flour. Additionally, the leaves can be used in a variety of salads, soups, and sauces.

If you are crafty then you can use the stems and fibers for papermaking! Otherwise, sit back and enjoy the butterflies and moths that frequent these tall, lovely blooms throughout your garden.

Pros

  • Great for culinary and practical uses
  • Seeds able to be cultivated indoors in winter, and outdoors in summer
  • Annual/perennial plant

Cons

  • Can have issues with weeds and invasive species
  • Small number of seeds for the price

6. Luna Red Hardy Hibiscus Moscheutos Flower Small Bush

Small Bush Flower
Luna Red Hardy Hibiscus Moscheutos Flower

Hardy hibiscus hybrids of the “Luna” variety are ideal for many gardens, and the Luna Red Hardy Hibiscus Moscheutos Flower Small Bush mix is no different. Enjoy these bright blooms from planting in the spring until the fall’s first frost.

Style: Seed packet

Application: Ready to plant

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 11

Number of Pieces: 10

These hibiscus plants are a wonderful addition to your yard. Place them in full sun, with well-drained soil conditions, and watch the Jocad and Balhibred varieties flourish. They are great for a variety of zones, and will grow back after winter.

If you plant them within a pot then taking them inside before the first frost allows them to continue blooming for several more months after the season ends.

Pros

  • Perennial for spring regrowth
  • Lovely mix of vibrant blooms

Cons

  • Small number of seeds for the price
  • Some customers have issues with perennial regrowth

FAQ

Hibiscus plants are a multi-faceted member of the botanical realm, with many specifics and individual considerations. Let’s dig deeper and look into more questions that gardeners often have about hibiscuses.

How Many Varieties Of Hibiscus Are There?

The hibiscus plant is among the most prolific in variety, with over 200 individual types available to gardeners. These plants vary significantly in size, color, hardiness, and regrowth, so it’s important to choose the best for you.

How Do I Know What Kind Of Hibiscus I Have?

Identifying your particular kind of hibiscus plant can be difficult, given the wide range available. However, you can typically tell the difference between hibiscus types by looking at bloom sizes, colors, and how long they last.

Hardy, Rose of Sharon, and Tropical Hibiscus plants all have particular appearances and growing conditions.

Does Hibiscus Need Full Sun?

Most hibiscus plants do require full sun exposure, however, some are able to live in somewhat shaded areas as well. For best growth conditions, make sure that your hibiscus has access to the sun for about 6 to 8 hours per day. This helps with vibrancy and overall plant health.

Are Hibiscus Poisonous To Animals?

Thankfully, hibiscus tends to be non-toxic to animals. However, when consumed in combination with another harmful garden substance, hibiscus can still cause damage to your dog, cat, or other household pet, so exercising caution with pets and plants is essential.

How Do I Get More Flowers On My Hibiscus?

Hibiscus plants are known for flowering repeatedly and lushly, but some might suffer from sporadic blooms. The best way to fix this is by revisiting your watering and fertilizing schedule, and ensuring your hibiscuses have full access to essential nutrients.

They are not typically picky plants, but too much or too little water and a dearth of proper minerals and nutrients will negatively impact blooming.

Is There A Difference Between A Hibiscus Plant And A Hibiscus Tree?

Interestingly, hibiscuses can be grown as either a bush or tree, depending on the type. If you have a woody variety of hibiscus, training them into tree form is very easy to do and will have great results. Softer hibiscuses might thrive better as a smaller shrub though.

If you want to experiment with cultivating your hibiscus plant into a tree instead of a shrub, begin with the strongest stem and work them into a multi-branched tree over time.

How Deep Do Hibiscus Roots Grow?

Hibiscus roots are comprised of both taproots and shallow, liminal roots that spread several feet underground, enough to hold up the entire plant, which can reach above 12 feet in height.

However, hibiscuses tend to be relatively shallow-rooted for such large plants, and are prone to uprooting in windy or erosive conditions.

Should Hibiscus Be Pruned?

You can prune your hibiscus plant to encourage healthy and vigorous growth. By rejuvenating budding sprouts, you can promote even more flowers on your plant. Try pruning in the spring or early fall, but avoid it during the winter months for perennials.


Final Thoughts

Hibiscus plants are among some of the prettiest flowers you can have in your garden. Not only are they a largely low-maintenance plant, but they also provide repeated blooms all summer long, and can be found in perennials that regrow in the spring.

And with the wide range of styles, colors, and sizes when it comes to hibiscus varieties, every flower enthusiast or gardener is sure to find the perfect type for their climate and personal tastes!

Leave a Comment